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Care & Wellness

  • The American Staffordshire Terrier, like the other bull terrier breeds, has a reputation as a fighting dog. But with the exception of those that have been poorly socialized or trained to fight, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a fine, affectionate canine companion who has been unfairly targeted by legislation aimed at outlawing the breed.

  • Energetic and playful, the American Water Spaniel loves kids and makes a great companion for active people. They enjoy investigating, running, hunting, fetching, and swimming. This sporting breed likes to keep moving and needs lots of exercise, but isn't as gregarious as more familiar spaniels like Springers and Brittanys.

  • Hailing from Turkey, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog was bred to guard livestock. The breed is not well-known outside of his native land, except to fanciers. Guarding instincts are highly developed and can be misplaced if owners are not aware of this.

  • Many owners of small mammals are surprised to learn that all pets need at least an annual checkup. Exotic pet veterinarians typically recommend check-ups at least once a year for young, healthy pets and twice a year for geriatric animals. During a check-up your veterinarian may recommend diagnostic testing, including blood testing, fecal analysis, microbiological testing, and radiography. While most of diagnostic tests can be performed on awake animals, depending on the species and temperament of the pet, some exotic pet veterinarians recommend performing these tests under short-acting gas anesthesia.

  • A cat that is not wanting to eat or is not eating, is a cat who has a potentially life-threatening medical condition. Many conditions can lead to the inability of your cat to eat or for your cat to lose her appetite completely. It is important to find the underlying cause so that an appropriate treatment plan can be created. Appetite stimulants may be prescribed and in some cases a feeding tube may be placed by your veterinarian. Decreased food intake or any change in eating habits warrants investigation by your veterinarian.

  • A dog that is not wanting to eat or is not eating, is a dog who has a potentially life-threatening medical condition. Many conditions can lead to the inability of your dog to eat or for your dog to lose his appetite completely. It is important to find the underlying cause so that an appropriate treatment plan can be created. Appetite stimulants may be prescribed and in some cases a feeding tube may be placed by your veterinarian. Decreased food intake or any change in eating habits warrants investigation by your veterinarian.

  • The proper administration of eye medication is critical in helping your cat quickly recover from an eye injury or infection. Gently clean away any debris around your cat's eyes with warm water and a washcloth. Hold the bottle using the thumb and index finger of your dominant hand with the tip pointed downwards. Use the last two fingers of the same hand to pull back the upper eyelid. Place your remaining fingers under the cat's jaw to support the head. The lower eyelid will act as a pouch to receive the drops. DO NOT touch the eye's surface with the applicator. Aiming for the center of the eye, squeeze the desired number of drops onto the eyeball.

  • Applying eye ointments to your cat's eye(s) can be a challenging or easy task. The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your cat's prompt recovery. It is important to use the medication as directed for the full duration and contact your veterinarian if you have problems. The tips and instructions in this handout may make administering your cat's eye ointment easier.

  • Applying eye ointments to your dog's eye(s) can be a challenging or easy task. The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your dog’s prompt recovery. It is important to use the medication as directed for the full duration and contact your veterinarian if you have problems. The tips and instructions in this handout may make administering your dog’s eye ointment easier.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. Creams, ointments, and lotions are for external use only. It is important to prevent your cat from licking and swallowing any of these external preparations as they may contain ingredients that could be harmful if swallowed. Most topical preparations work better if they are gently massaged in for a few moments after application. It is always a good idea to get someone to help hold your cat, especially when applying medications on a sensitive or painful area. If you still have trouble keeping your pet from licking the medication, please contact your veterinarian to get your cat fitted for an Elizabethan collar.